Sunday, July 11, 2010

It's hot, it's dinner time, and being lazy I'm just going to point you

to some things of interest.
Like this on Personal Defense Weapons, kind of what the M1 Carbine was intended to be. Looks like they're concentrating on machine pistols with folding stocks in various cartridges.

Anything that starts out Michael Moore is an artistic and intellectual thief is worth reading. Even if it isn't any surprise.


On the McDonald v. Chicago decision:
This focus on African-American history left more than a few liberal commentators scratching their heads. Washington Post columnist Courtland Milloy—who recently said he would like to “knock every racist and homophobic tooth” out of the mouths of Tea Party activists—was shocked by the stirring words of the conservative justice. “This was no muttering from an Uncle Tom, as many black people have accused him of being,” Milloy wrote, perhaps alluding to his own previous unguarded thoughts about Thomas. “His advocacy for black self-defense is straight from the heart of Malcolm X.”
Well, duh, you mush-brained progressive jackass. Thomas never was an Uncle Tom; you were just too bigoted to see him as a real, live human of great capability because he didn't agree with your views.

Effing morons.


Althouse on the current version of the Coffee Party. I'll add in something from Insty on the 'One Nation' name:
UPDATE: A reader writes: “Though this also pops to mind: Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Nation, ein F├╝hrer.”

ANOTHER UPDATE: Reader Eric Thompson writes: “Don’t forget the eminently forgettable ‘A New Way Forward’.” Ah yes, with the miserable failure at imitating Tea Party protests. Good times, good times . . . .


And now you'll have to entertain yourselves for a while.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

On the PDW link:
The paragraph on the Russian and Chinese approaches to the ammo (solid sub-cal core, a sabot-style round), and its ability to penetrate body armor, make me think of something I read 20+ years ago on people casting solid (zinc, I believe?) bullets that supposedly had that armor-piercing ability. What a media scare THAT was in its day!
Maybe it's time to reintroduce the study of casting sold bullets from something other then (relatively soft) lead, and studying its effects on current issue body armor, wear on barrels, receiver pressure readings, etc, etc.

B Woodman
III-per

Keith said...

The spinning wheel of gun development, and how much armour does it take before it gets too heavy and too uncomfortable to be worth wearing...

A lot of research grants to come up with the 5.7 Johnson Spitfire (depending on your viewpont this is equally a necked down .30 carbine or one route to achieve a rimless K hornet)

The 6.5 x 25 (a necked down .30 mauser / .30 tok)

You would get similar performance from putting a lathe turned tungsten bullet into one of the commercially available .30 caliber sabots and loading it in a .30 tok cartridge (a la .223 timbs loading of the tok).

Machineable tungsten alloys are available (from folk like johnson matthey, for things like EDM machining electrodes) and if things get desperate, you can salvage tungsten darts from guys down at the bar.

the alloys are available up to Specific gravity of around 18 compared to about 12 for lead or 8 for steel, so there is significant potential for high ballistic coefficeint projectiles without having to go to fast twist barrels to stabilise them.

I'd guess that the un worn front ends of shot out .30 cal rifle barrels could be re-cycled for experiments (hey, why not save the planet while we're busy! ;^) ).

That 6X35 looks like a supersonic loading of a whisper(tm) or a necked up fireball.

The guns shown look like really awkward, slow mounting pieces of over priced, over engineered waste of tax payer's money (shite@.gov for you)

It's a while since I read dmetrieff's work, but I seem to remember that a 4.5 pound bolt would have allowed the .30 carbine to be a blowback, rather than the over complicated gas operated thing with snap off locking lugs. The lighter sabot round would need a lighter bolt - what is not to like about that?

STENs fitted with decent mags, and a few of the rough edges smoothed off were extremely reliable, and from a rest, would group to about 4" at 100 yards. Modern red dot sights would more than make up for the small sighting radius and high vel sabot loadings would make for much flatter trajectories and longer effective range.

Close up, the Israelis used Uzis to clear Syrians armed with AKs out of trenches and tunnels on the Golan Heights in the 6 Day war - so V effective!

At the height of production, STENS were costing about £2 each (guess that's about £100 in todays money) and were simple enough for resistance movements in Europe, the Zionists in pre '47 Palestine and the Viet Cong to make at home.

How fast burning is the powder in car airbags?


It's getting time I moved to a jurisdiction where I can try some of this shit out!

Keith said...

The spinning wheel of gun development, and how much armour does it take before it gets too heavy and too uncomfortable to be worth wearing...

A lot of research grants to come up with the 5.7 Johnson Spitfire (depending on your viewpont this is equally a necked down .30 carbine or one route to achieve a rimless K hornet)

The 6.5 x 25 (a necked down .30 mauser / .30 tok)

You would get similar performance from putting a lathe turned tungsten bullet into one of the commercially available .30 caliber sabots and loading it in a .30 tok cartridge (a la .223 timbs loading of the tok).

Machineable tungsten alloys are available (from folk like johnson matthey, for things like EDM machining electrodes) and if things get desperate, you can salvage tungsten darts from guys down at the bar.

the alloys are available up to Specific gravity of around 18 compared to about 12 for lead or 8 for steel, so there is significant potential for high ballistic coefficeint projectiles without having to go to fast twist barrels to stabilise them.

I'd guess that the un worn front ends of shot out .30 cal rifle barrels could be re-cycled for experiments (hey, why not save the planet while we're busy! ;^) ).

That 6X35 looks like a supersonic loading of a whisper(tm) or a necked up fireball.

Cont.

Keith said...

Just on the sabot loading of lathe turned tungsten projectiles.

I wonder what they'd go through if they were fired out of an 06 at 4,000 fps?

Just on the love affair with the .45ACP - check out which round gave the only instant knockdown on with a chest shot on cattle in the slaughter yard - .30 Luger!

Keith said...

Sorry about the double post, feel free to erase the second one.

Here's a link to an old article at gunwriters on the net:

http://guns.connect.fi/gow/2030.html

It looks at using a .30 carbine type round to launch both full diameter bullets and sabot sub calibre rounds.

an interesting twist is the use of a counterbored case head, like the 20mm oerlikon cannon rounds, so that the case can be inserted a long long way into the chamber, thus allowing a blowback action with a very light bolt to be used for hot cartridges.

The bolt moves a considerable distance while the bullet is still in the barrel, but the case remains supported by the long chamber.

You can achieve a similler effect with dramatically rebated conventional rims, and either a rebated rim or the female type case head can be made as a separate screw on attachment for conventional brass.

Remember the O'Connor steel headed brass cases? His patent gives some good ideas in that direction.