Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Someone who should be remembered

Robert Hicks has died.

Who?

From The Times-Picayune:

Robert Hicks, a lion in the Louisiana civil rights movement whose legal victories helped topple segregation in Bogalusa and change discriminatory employment practices throughout the South, died Tuesday in his home. He was 81.

What does that have to do with the right of the people to keep and bear arms?

The Hicks family opened their home to white civil rights workers and national figures such as entertainer Dick Gregory and Congress of Racial Equality head James Farmer. Because of that, the family was targeted by the Ku Klux Klan, which in turn motivated the formation of the Deacons for Defense and Justice, an armed band of African-American men who stood guard at the Hicks' home and protected civil rights workers in the city. The 2003 Showtime movie "Deacons for Defense" was loosely based on the group
.
So why don't we hear more about him?
Back to The Times memorial:

By 1968, the Deacons had pretty much vanished. In time they were “hardly a footnote in most books on the civil rights movement,” Mr. Hill said. He attributed this to a “mythology” that the rights movement was always nonviolent.

Mrs. Hicks said she was glad it was not.

“I became very proud of black men,” she said. “They didn’t bow down and scratch their heads. They stood up like men.”

As should we all
.

A lot of people forget, or just don't know, that the reason behind a LOT of personal disarmament laws was keeping blacks from owning arms. Never forget this from the Dred Scott decision:
(Citizenship) would give to persons of the negro race, who were recognized as citizens in any one State of the Union, the right to enter every other State whenever they pleased, singly or in companies, without pass or passport, and without obstruction, to sojourn there as long as they pleased, to go where they pleased at every hour of the day or night without molestation, unless they committed some violation of law for which a white man would be punished; and it would give them the full liberty of speech in public and in private upon all subjects upon which its own citizens might speak; to hold public meetings upon political affairs, and to keep and carry arms wherever they went.

1 comment:

martywd said...

Maybe you've seen this vid from JPFO?   If not, or for anyone wondering why we have the gun laws we have today, a view of "No Guns for Negroes" (36 MB) is 20 mins worth spending.
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