Tuesday, March 31, 2015

On comparing Obama to Neville Chamberlain

By the way, I'm growing rather weary of the cheap comparisons of Obama with Neville Chamberlain. The British Prime Minister got the biggest issue of the day wrong. But no one ever doubted that he loved his country. That's why, after his eviction from Downing Street, Churchill kept him on in his ministry as Lord President of the Council, and indeed made Chamberlain part of the five-man war cabinet and had him chair it during his frequent absences. When he died of cancer in October 1940, Churchill wept over his coffin. 

So please don't insult Neville Chamberlain by comparing him to Obama.


3 comments:

knuckledraggertech said...

Churchill always felt that Chamberlain played the hand that was dealt him by Stanley Baldwin, who was PM during the thirties and oversaw the disarmament of Great Britain. Winston was said to have remarked upon hearing of Baldwin's death; " Embalm, cremate, and bury; take no chances..." Churchill's biographer Martin Gilbert claims that it is the most vicious denunciation that he ever heard from the former PM.

knottedprop said...

Listen to Chamberlains declaration of war it's very moving and not something he took lightly, it has emerged that all the deals with Hitler were done to buy the necessary time for Britain to rearm and that was only to reach full effect in 1942 or so. However it has now been found out if Chamberlain had called Hitlers bluff, Hitler was prepared to back down and bide his time for another day. Hitler was also a noted Anglophile and even had family in Liverpool and was amenable to working with the British empire than against it. Lucky for the World neither Chamberlain nor Churchill really trusted him.

Windy Wilson said...

What credible evidence is out there that Hitler actually wanted a war at that time over Czechoslovakia and was annoyed at the agreement with Chamberlain? I have been a long-time student of WW2, and I have read about that, and what Knottedprop says makes sense, but I don't know the reliability of the websites.