Wednesday, August 31, 2016

I'd imagine John Effing Kerry would prefer it

if we didn't hear about this; reporting on such things just upsets us, y'know.
In exclusive interviews, photos and research, The Associated Press has documented and mapped 72 of the mass graves, the most comprehensive survey so far, with many more expected to be uncovered as the Islamic State group's territory shrinks. In Syria, AP has obtained locations for 17 mass graves, including one with the bodies of hundreds of members of a single tribe all but exterminated when IS extremists took over their region. For at least 16 of the Iraqi graves, most in territory too dangerous to excavate, officials do not even guess the number of dead. In others, the estimates are based on memories of traumatized survivors, Islamic State propaganda and what can be gleaned from a cursory look at the earth.

Still, even the known numbers of victims buried are staggering — from 5,200 to more than 15,000.

Sinjar mountain is dotted with mass graves, some in territory clawed back from IS after the group's onslaught against the Yazidi minority in August 2014; others in the deadly no man's land that has yet to be secured.

'Raises questions'?
This isn't the first time questions have been raised about whether Clinton actually turned over all the relevent emails from her work at the State Department. In June, the Wall Street Journal reported on a 2010 email exchange between Clinton and Huma Abedin, her top aide, in which the secretary worried about her personal email becoming accessible to the public. That exchange was included in the State Department Inspector General's report on Clinton's email use but it was absent from the files turned over to the FBI and released to the public—a sign that was "raising questions about the thoroughness of her disclosures to the government and her record-keeping practices as secretary of state," the paper said.
If it takes this to 'raise questions' about her lies, you haven't been paying attention.  At all.

This brings up Uncle's saying 'Gun control is what politicians do instead of something.'
"The shooter was typically a male black between the ages of 17 and 23," O'Connor said. "And the victim was typically a male black between the ages of 17 and 23. So what's changed since the '90s? Not much, the same social pathology, and the police are expected to clean it up."

Some call it "gun violence," a definition greatly appreciated by Democratic politicians like those at City Hall. They can point to guns and take that voter anger over homicide numbers and channel it into a safe space.

But there are plenty of guns in the suburbs, and suburbanites aren't slaughtering each other.

It's the gang wars.

Politicians know that the gangs are reason for the deaths. Calling it "gun violence" is much safer, especially in wards where gangs often provide political muscle.

"Have you ever heard a Chicago alderman call out a street gang by name?" O'Connor asked. "No? Me neither."

Oh yes, people can play that game.
A Minnesota program to buy up guns in exchange for Visa gift cards has been less successful than anticipated. The guns collected were mostly homemade, unused or antiquated firearms rather than the street guns authorities had hoped to remove from the street.
Take a beat-up, or non-working gun and trade it for a $100 card, now that's a deal!

The buyback event also served as a de facto firearms marketplace.  Gun collector Paul Joat bought two guns  by making a better offer than the city made with their gift cards.

 Now, if you'll excuse me, I think I'll take the dogs to the lake

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